Car Insurance Claims

Spring Maintenance Tips to Protect Your Home

A home is one of life’s most important investments. Keeping it properly maintained can help reduce the risk of a loss and help ensure the safety and well being of friends and family. Just in time for spring, Paul Fisher Insurance Services and Travelers, a leading provider of auto and homeowners insurance, offer these maintenance tips to prepare your home for warmer weather and to keep it safe year-round:

• Inspect your smoke detectors. Make sure that there is one on each floor of your home. Test them and change the batteries at least every six months, when you change your clocks.
• Check the light bulbs in all your fixtures to be sure that they are the correct wattage as recommended by the manufacturer.
• Replace lamps that use high-producing bulbs (such as halogen) with those that use fluorescent bulbs and operate at much cooler temperatures.
• Check your electrical outlets for potential fire hazards such as frayed wires or loose-fitting plugs. Be sure not to overload electrical outlets, fuse boxes, extension cords or any other power service.
• Keep a multi-purpose fire extinguisher accessible that is filled and ready for operation.
• Have your air conditioning system inspected by a professional as recommended by the manufacturer.
• Check for damage to your roof, and clean gutters and downspouts to keep debris from accumulating.
• Check your water heater for leaks and corrosion, and keep surrounding area clear.
• Clean and/or replace your furnace filter.
• Clean the clothes dryer exhaust duct and space under the dryer. Remove all lint, dust, and pieces of material or cloth.
• Inspect washing machine hoses and replace hoses that show signs of wear or leakage with stronger reinforced hoses. Turn off the water when not in use to prevent water damage if a hose breaks.
• In your yard, remove all dead trees and keep healthy trees and bushes trimmed and away from utility wires. Do not attempt to remove tree limbs from power lines yourself. Instead, call your power company to request assistance.
• Safely store oil and gas for lawn equipment and tools in a vented, secured area.
• Repair driveway and walkways that are cracked, broken or uneven to provide a level walking surface.

Established in 1983, Paul Fisher Insurance Services is an independent insurance agency offering a full range of insurance products including Auto, Home, Life, Equipment Leasing, Business Owners Insurance, Wedding Protection, Special Occasion Protection, and much more!

For information and quotes on insurance coverage, please visit
Paul Fisher Insurance Services at 3967 William Penn Highway Suite 3, Murrysville, PA 15668 or call (724)519-7503.

About Travelers
Travelers understands that life and business are inherently dynamic and that the best way to serve agents and policyholders is to deliver insurance that evolves to stay in-synch with life and business as they change. For more information on being in-synch, visit www.travelers.com.
The Travelers Companies, Inc. (NYSE: TRV) is a leading property casualty insurer selling primarily through independent agents and brokers. The company’s diverse business lines offer its global customers a wide range of coverage in both the personal and commercial settings, including automobile, homeowners, construction, small business, oil and gas, ocean marine, surety and management liability, global technology and public sector services. Travelers is a Fortune 100 company, with 2007 revenues of $26 billion and total assets of $115 billion. The company has approximately 33,000 employees.

Teenagers More Reckless Drivers than Adults

Road accident kills approximately 43,000 people every year, making it the number one cause of preventable deaths in the US, according to a study conducted by the Department of Transportation.

A survey done by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDCP) in 2005 revealed that car accident was the leading cause of death among teenagers ages 16 to 19 years old and accounted for 36 percent of deaths among this age group.

In its 2004 study, CDCP said more than 4,500 teenagers have died in car accidents in that same year. With this finding, the department concluded that teenage drivers are four times more likely to encounter road accidents than older drivers.

Several studies suggested that teens are more reckless and risk-taking drivers compared to older people. Meanwhile, gender also plays a vital role in car accidents as it has been found that male teenage drivers are 1.5 times more likely to be involved in collision than female drivers.

The risk increases when teenagers are behind the wheel without adult supervision. Also, the CDCP has found out that the likelihood of an accident increases with the number of teen passengers.

In 2005, the CDCP conducted a comprehensive study on the relation of reckless driving and teen drivers. Here some of the findings:

• Traffic accidents are particularly high within the first year after teenagers receive their driver’s license.

• It is more likely for teens to underestimate a dangerous situation compared to older drivers.

• Teens are more likely to over-speed than older drivers. Thirty-eight percent of male teenage drivers who were involved in fatal car accidents were speeding while 24 percent of them were found to have high alcohol level in their blood.

• Teens are more likely to cut into the lane than any age group.

• The presence of male teenage passengers may increase the risky behavior of young drivers.

• Teens have the lowest rate of seatbelt use among age groups. According to a study, 12.5 percent of male students admitted to rarely or never use seatbelts compared to 10 percent among female students.

• Three out of four teen drivers who died in a car accident were found to be under the influence of alcohol.

• Most deaths involving teenage drivers occurred between 3 pm and midnight and occurred on weekends.

Penalties for reckless drivers

According to the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV), reckless driving can result to license revocation especially when this has caused injury or death to other motorists and passengers.

On the other hand, if a person is caught driving without a license, a federal court can ask DMV to delay the issuance of license for up to three years after he or she is eligible to drive.

According to law, a driver convicted of reckless driving may face up to 90 days in prison or pay up to $1000. In some cases, if the court decides that the driver’s action is wanton and extremely negligent, he or she can face both penalties.

Reckless drivers who commit hit-and-run, who drive under the influence of drugs or alcohol, or drivers who run away from a police officer will face stricter penalties such as higher fines and suspension of license.

via Teenagers More Reckless Drivers than Adults – Article Blast! Free Articles And Content For Reprint On Your Website, Newsletters and Ezines. Submit Your Articles For Free!.

Police issue winter driving tips, info – CBS 21 News – Breaking news, sports and weather for the Harrisburg Pennsylvania area

Driving safely on icy roads

* Decrease your speed and leave yourself plenty of room to stop. You should allow at least three times more space than usual between you and the car in front of you.

* Brake gently to avoid skidding. If your wheels start to lock up, ease off the brake.

* Turn on your lights to increase your visibility to other motorists.

* Keep your lights and windshield clean.

* Use low gears to keep traction, especially on hills.

* Do not use cruise control or overdrive on icy roads.

* Be especially careful on bridges, overpasses and infrequently traveled roads, which will freeze first. Even at temperatures above freezing, if the conditions are wet, you might encounter ice in shady areas or on exposed roadways like bridges.

* Do not pass snowplows and sanding trucks. The drivers have limited visibility, and you are likely to find the road in front of them worse than the road behind.

* Do not assume your vehicle can handle all conditions. Even four-wheel and front-wheel drive vehicles can encounter trouble on winter roads.

If your rear wheels skid…

* Take your foot off the accelerator.

* Steer in the direction you want the front wheels to go. If your rear wheels are sliding left, steer left. If they are sliding right, steer right.

* If your rear wheels start sliding the other way as you recover, ease the steering wheel toward that side. You might have to steer left and right a few times to get your vehicle completely under control.

* If you have standard brakes, pump them gently.

* If you have anti-lock brakes (ABS), do not pump the brakes. Apply steady pressure to the brakes. You will feel the brakes pulse — this is normal.

If your front wheels skid…

* Take your foot off the gas and shift to neutral, but do not try to steer immediately.

* As the wheels skid sideways, they will slow the vehicle and traction will return. As it does, steer in the direction you want to go. Then put the transmission in “drive” or release the clutch, and accelerate gently.

If you are stuck…

* Do not spin your wheels. This will only dig you in deeper.

* Turn your wheels from side to side a few times to push snow out of the way.

* Use a light touch on the gas, to ease your car out.

* Use a shovel to clear snow away from the wheels and the underside of the car.

* Pour sand, kitty litter, gravel, or salt in the path of the wheels, to help get traction.

* Try rocking the vehicle. (Check your owner’s manual first — it can damage the transmission on some vehicles.) Shift from forward to reverse, and back again. Each time you are in gear, give a light touch on the gas until the vehicle gets going.

via Police issue winter driving tips, info – CBS 21 News – Breaking news, sports and weather for the Harrisburg Pennsylvania area.

Winter Driving Tips for Northeast Pennsylvania – Associated Content from Yahoo! – associatedcontent.com

Driving in the snow is something anyone who lives in North East Pennsylvania should know. One of the first lessons I learned when I received my driver’s license was to drive in the snow and how to be prepared in the

vehicle when driving through a snow storm. The best tip I learned was to stay home unless you absolutely must go somewhere. Your life is not worth risking if you feel the roads are dangerous.

Northeast Pennsylvania Driving Tip #1

Stay Home! Most of us know when a storm is approaching. Local news sources like WNEP, WBRE and CBS keep us up to date on when the weather is going to get ugly. Prepare yourself by watching the weather channel or your local news station. If they say 25 inches of snow is going to fall from the sky, make arrangements to stay home. Most likely, businesses in the area re going to close anyway.

Northeast Pennsylvania Driving Tip #2

If you don’t have a 4 wheel drive vehicle then when winter rolls around in the Poconos you are going to need to get it. 4 wheel drive vehicles help you get around when the snow is on the ground. It should be considered a must-have on a vehicle if you are going to live in Northeast Pennsylvania.

Northeast Pennsylvania Driving Tip #3

If you must drive, prepare your vehicle. Place emergency gear in the truck that includes flash lights, blankets, an extra set of clothes, flashers and other emergency equipment and make sure you have a full tank of gas. Several roads become closed when the weather gets bad. You might get stuck on the road and run out of fuel to keep you warm. Extra blankets and clothes will come in handy when that happens.

Northeast Pennsylvania Driving Tip #4

Bring food wherever you are traveling. In case of being stranded, you will have food to eat. There is no telling how long it will take for emergency vehicles to arrive and help. Having food like crackers, water, soda and other snacks will help to keep your hunger at bay until help arrives.

via Winter Driving Tips for Northeast Pennsylvania – Associated Content from Yahoo! – associatedcontent.com.

Winter Driving Tips

Preparation is one key to successfully navigating winter roads. Winter weather can bring unexpected conditions, so make sure that both you and your vehicle are ready for ice and snow.

Traffic in snow Getting Your Vehicle Ready for Winter

Getting Your Vehicle Ready for Winter

Preparation is one key to successfully navigating winter roads. Winter weather can bring unexpected conditions, so make sure that your vehicle is ready for ice and snow. Prior to the winter driving season, you should have a mechanic check the brakes, battery, hoses and belts. Below are some additional tips for getting your vehicle ready for winter.

* Check that your fluid levels are full.

* Make sure your wipers don´t streak. You may want to consider installing winter wiper blades.

* Ensure that your heater and defroster are working properly.

* Check that your vehicle´s radio is working properly so you can receive weather and traffic reports.

* Make sure all lights are working.

* Check to be sure that tires are properly inflated and have sufficient tread depth.

* If you live in an area prone to heavy snow, you may want to use dedicated snow tires on your vehicle or carry a set of tire chains. At a minimum, your all-weather tires should be mud and snow rated.

* In the case of a problem, contact a mechanic immediately.

Row of Snowplows With Cruiser Winter Emergency Kit

Winter Emergency Kit

PennDOT recommends packing a winter emergency kit in your vehicle anytime you travel. The following items should be considered for your kit:

* Flashlight and batteries

* Battery-operated radio

* Jumper cables

* Cell phone and charger

* Snow shovel

* Matches and candles

* First aid supplies

* Extra warm clothing and gloves

* Blanket

* Ice scraper

* Sand

* Bottled water

* Non-perishable food

* Anything else you may need to accommodate family traveling with you (special medication, baby supplies, pet food, etc.)

Winter Driving Tips Winter Driving Tips

Winter Driving Tips

Remember, if winter weather is forecast, eliminate all unnecessary travel. This will keep you and your family safe and allow PennDOT to more easily perform our winter duties. However, if you must travel, PennDOT offers the following tips for safe driving this winter season.

* Carry a winter emergency travel kit.

* Listen to weather and travel advisories, and if you don´t have to travel in bad weather, don´t.

* Keep your gas tank at least half full.

* Slow down and increase following distance.

* Avoid sudden stops and starts.

* Beware of roads that may look wet, but are actually frozen, often referred to as “black ice.”

* Use extra caution on bridges and ramps where ice can often form without warning.

* Carry a cell phone.

* Do not use cruise control while driving on snow-covered roads.

* State law requires you to turn on your headlights when your wipers are on.

* Use your low beams in bad weather, especially in cases of heavy or blowing snow.

* Remove ice and snow from windows, mirrors and all vehicle lights as often as needed.

* Remove snow and ice from the hood and roof of your vehicle. State law states that if snow or ice from your vehicle strikes a vehicle or person and causes death or injury, you can be ticketed.

* Do not park or abandon your vehicle on snow emergency routes.

* Do not pass or get between trucks plowing in a plow line (several trucks plowing side by side).

* Make sure someone else knows where you are going and when you expect to arrive. In case you run into an emergency and need help, someone will know where to look for you.

* If you do become stranded, it´s better to stay with your vehicle until help arrives. Run the engine every hour or so, but make sure the tailpipe is clear and keep the downwind window cracked open.

* Do not drink and drive and always wear your seat belt.

via Winter Driving.

Winter Driving Tips

Driving on snowy or icy roads requires special attention to safety. Although it’s impossible to have ideal road conditions 365 days a year, there are certain precautions you can take to make winter driving safer. Here are some tips and suggestions to help you get ready for the hazards of winter. And check the links at the bottom of this page for information on MoDOT Plowing Priorities and tips on shoveling your driveway. Before the Trip Winterize your car with fresh antifreeze, a good battery, a properly operating exhaust system and oil that will withstand the rigors of cold weather. If possible, avoid driving until the roads are safe and passable. You don’t want to slide off the road, and we don’t want to plow around disabled vehicles. Do a thorough pretrip inspection of your vehicle, paying special attention to your tires, brakes, windshield wipers and windshield wiper fluid.Equip Your Vehicle With: A flashlight with extra batteries A firstaid kit Necessary medications Blankets and/or sleeping bags Extra mittens or gloves, socks, a warm cap and rain gear A small sack of sand to use for traction under your wheels A small shovel Booster cables Small tools – pliers, wrench, screwdriver A brightly colored cloth to use as a flag Nonperishable foods Bottled waterDuring the Trip Obey speed limits; don’t speed. Use common sense, and adjust your speed to suit driving conditions . Give snowplows plenty of room, and don’t pass them. Always wear your seat belt. Remember that driving is most dangerous when temperatures are near 32 degrees. Watch for other vehicles having problems with road conditions. Keep mirrors, windows and lights clean; keep your lights on. Don’t pass other vehicles on or near bridges. Keep your fuel tank at least half full. If you don’t feel comfortable driving, park at the first safe place.If You’re Trapped in Your Car Stay in the vehicle. Don’t leave to search for help. It’s easy to become disoriented and lost in blowing and drifting snow. Display a trouble sign. Hang a brightly colored cloth on the antenna. Run the engine for about 10 minutes each hour. Run the heater and turn on the dome light only when the vehicle is running. Keep the exhaust pipe clear of snow, and open a window slightly for ventilation. Clap hands and move your arms and legs occasionally. Don’t stay in one position for too long. If more than one person is in the car, take turns sleeping. Huddle together for warmth. Use newspapers, maps and even car mats for added insulation.

via Winter Driving Tips.

Car Insurance Claim

Car Insurance Claim on wiseGEEK:

* If you are found guilty of violating the state financial responsibility laws concerning car insurance, you may find it much more difficult to obtain affordable coverage in the future.

* Even if no immediate emergency medical assistance was required, you may still want to go to the hospital for an evaluation, as car accident injuries such as whiplash may not present immediately but could show up several days later. To pay out the car accident claim, the car insurance companies will want to investigate the traffic accident and determine liability.

via Car Insurance Claim.

Winter Driving Safety Tips

Driving safely on icy roads

  1. Decrease your speed and leave yourself plenty of room to stop. You should allow at least three times more space than usual between you and the car in front of you.
  2. Brake gently to avoid skidding. If your wheels start to lock up, ease off the brake.
  3. Turn on your lights to increase your visibility to other motorists.
  4. Keep your lights and windshield clean.
  5. Use low gears to keep traction, especially on hills.
  6. Don’t use cruise control or overdrive on icy roads.
  7. Be especially careful on bridges, overpasses and infrequently traveled roads, which will freeze first. Even at temperatures above freezing, if the conditions are wet, you might encounter ice in shady areas or on exposed roadways like bridges.
  8. Don’t pass snow plows and sanding trucks. The drivers have limited visibility, and you’re likely to find the road in front of them worse than the road behind.
  9. Don’t assume your vehicle can handle all conditions. Even four-wheel and front-wheel drive vehicles can encounter trouble on winter roads.

If your rear wheels skid…

  1. Take your foot off the accelerator.
  2. Steer in the direction you want the front wheels to go. If your rear wheels are sliding left, steer left. If they’re sliding right, steer right.
  3. If your rear wheels start sliding the other way as you recover, ease the steering wheel toward that side. You might have to steer left and right a few times to get your vehicle completely under control.
  4. If you have standard brakes, pump them gently.
  5. If you have anti-lock brakes (ABS), do not pump the brakes. Apply steady pressure to the brakes. You will feel the brakes pulse — this is normal.

If your front wheels skid…

  1. Take your foot off the gas and shift to neutral, but don’t try to steer immediately.
  2. As the wheels skid sideways, they will slow the vehicle and traction will return. As it does, steer in the direction you want to go. Then put the transmission in “drive” or release the clutch, and accelerate gently.

If you get stuck…

  1. Do not spin your wheels. This will only dig you in deeper.
  2. Turn your wheels from side to side a few times to push snow out of the way.
  3. Use a light touch on the gas, to ease your car out.
  4. Use a shovel to clear snow away from the wheels and the underside of the car.
  5. Pour sand, kitty litter, gravel or salt in the path of the wheels, to help get traction.
  6. Try rocking the vehicle. (Check your owner’s manual first — it can damage the transmission on some vehicles.) Shift from forward to reverse, and back again. Each time you’re in gear, give a light touch on the gas until the vehicle gets going.

Third-party claim | Define Third-party claim at Dictionary.com

Legal Dictionary

Main Entry: third–party claim

Function: noun

1 : a claim made against a third party in a third-party complaint —compare COUNTERCLAIM, CROSS-ACTION, CROSS-CLAIM

2 : a claim made by an injured third party (as a third-party beneficiary of workers’ compensation insurance) against an insurer or insured for indemnification

via Third-party claim | Define Third-party claim at Dictionary.com.

third-party claim – Wiktionary

third-party claim (plural third-party claims)

1. A derivative lawsuit brought by a defendant in an original lawsuit, claiming that another new party being brought in is responsible for or should share in the plaintiff’s damages against the defendant.

* Practise note: the third party being sued by the defendant is cited as “First Third Party”, “Second Third Party” etc.

via third-party claim – Wiktionary.

Baldwin Benaware
KC Benefit Services Discount Card
What’s going on?
October 2018
M T W T F S S
« Oct    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031